How Too Much of This Can Lead to Decreased Health and Increased Belly Fat

February 23, 2018

Do you happen to know what I'm speaking of?

I'll show you.

Some have called it the “master” of all hormones.  Others curse it for its ability to wreak havoc on our body’s fragile endocrine balance. 

In spite of the mixed opinions, one thing is certain: cortisol is a powerful hormone necessary for life.  But if its level is not optimal in your body, your health could suffer.


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What is Cortisol?

 



The hormone cortisol is produced by the adrenal glands and is primarily responsible for regulating blood sugar, helping to metabolize fats, protein, and carbohydrates and assisting in managing our stress response. We all have times of stress in our lives, and cortisol helps us to function during these times.

When the stress goes up, cortisol kicks in and delivers help.  We get a quick burst of energy, our memory sharpens, our immunity increases, and our sensitivity to pain decreases.  These are all important and natural functions of cortisol and ensure that we are able to weather the curve balls that life throws at us.

However, if the stress doesn’t let up, neither does the cortisol.  Unfortunately, what is healthy in small bursts becomes dangerous over the long term.  If you have persistent stress in your life, then you have cortisol levels that are out of balance:  your body makes so much cortisol that it detrimentally affects your health. This leads to adrenal fatigue.

When you have prolonged, high levels of cortisol in your bloodstream
 

  • you will crave foods that are high in carbs (like cake and cookies),

  • you will gain weight in your abdominal area (which increases your risk of heart disease and diabetes) because you end up eating in a calorie surplus due to eating more of these high sugar, high-fat foods.

  • you will have trouble sleeping


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Cortisol and the Circadian Rhythm

 


 
Our bodies produce different chemicals during the day and night that control our sleep, energy, and mood.  The natural rhythm of this cycle is known as the Circadian Rhythm, and cortisol is a key player.

Under normal circumstances, your body produces cortisol in amounts largely determined by the clock.  Levels tend to be higher in morning—triggered by the emerging daylight--giving you a boost of energy to jumpstart your day.

As the day wears on, cortisol levels should drop, helping to prepare you for a good night’s sleep. Likewise, Melatonin (another hormone that affects your energy and sleep habits) levels should be lower in the morning but as the daylight fades, they should increase, helping you to begin relaxing and preparing for sleep. 

However, if you are under constant stress or if your adrenal glands are not functioning properly, your cortisol level may not drop off during the day. Instead, it may actually rise and stay at a dangerously high level. 

By the time bedtime rolls around, you will not feel sleepy.  You will feel “tired but wired,” and be unable to relax and fall asleep.

 
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Reset Your Circadian Clock

 


If you suspect that your natural, circadian rhythm is disrupted, don’t despair.  There are several things you can do to reset your clock so you can start sleeping better at night and waking up more refreshed in the morning.

 


Try the following tips:

  • Reduce stress.  Easier said than done, I know.  But many times our stress levels are correlated to our response to stressful situations. Learning how to cope with stress more effectively may be all it takes to balance your cortisol.

 

  • Be consistent.  Going to bed and getting at the same time each day will help to regulate your circadian rhythm. Practice this habit to slowly coax your body into a schedule.

 

  • Use light wisely.  Since your circadian rhythm is partially controlled by light, darken your room well when you go to bed, and flood it with light when it is time to get up.  Try using a full spectrum light in the mornings.

 

  • Avoid naps.  If your circadian clock is off, you may find that you get very sleepy in the afternoon.  However, taking a nap may make it more difficult to fall asleep at night.  Try to resist naps.

 

  • Eat most of your calories early.  If you can eat the bulk of your daily calories earlier in the day as opposed to later in the day, you may find that you can recalibrate your circadian rhythms more easily. (This is more of an optional tip, for some people it might work, for others not so much.)




Hope this helps!



Talk soon.



Scotty

 

 

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